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RECENT NEWS FROM HATTIESBURG CLINIC

New Trial Explores Connection Between Mouth Bacteria, Alzheimer’s

New Trial Explores Connection Between Mouth Bacteria, Alzheimer’s

New Trial Explores Connection Between Mouth Bacteria, Alzheimer’s

Hattiesburg Clinic Memory Center is now recruiting local patients aged 55-80-years-old with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease to participate in a clinical trial assessing a new investigational medicine.

CAN BACTERIA IN OUR MOUTH LEAD TO ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE?

The GAIN (GingipAIN Inhibitor for Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease) Trial is based on a growing body of scientific evidence that the P. gingivalis bacteria, most commonly associated with chronic periodontal disease, can infect the brain and cause Alzheimer’s.

The study is evaluating whether the oral investigational medicine COR388 can slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer’s. The medicine is designed to inactivate the toxic proteins, or gingipains, released by P. gingivalis that have been shown in animal studies to damage and destroy brain cells.

“We are proud to have been selected as a research site participating in this large international clinical trial to test a dramatically new way of understanding and treating Alzheimer’s disease,” said Ronald Schwartz, MD, principal investigator at Hattiesburg Clinic Memory Center. “For decades, much of the Alzheimer’s clinical research has focused on other approaches with little success. In the GAIN Trial, we are evaluating a completely different mechanism of Alzheimer’s. We are testing the hypothesis that bacteria can cause Alzheimer’s, and that inactivating the toxic proteins released by the bacteria can have a positive impact on stopping or slowing the progression of this devastating disease.”

ABOUT THE TRIAL DRUG

The study drug, COR388, was designed by pharmaceutical company Cortexyme to inactivate the toxic gingipains created by the P. gingivalis bacteria, reduce inflammation, reduce the bacterial infection and slow or halt progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

An earlier small clinical study showed COR388 was well-tolerated, with a promising trend of average improvement in the memory test performance for the Alzheimer’s patients in the study who took the drug compared to placebo.

To learn more, contact Kayleigh Russell at (601) 579-5016 or visit www.GainTrial.com.

Click here to watch Dr. Schwartz talk about the trial in a news interview.

Jonah Taylor

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